forgotten/lost/miscellaneous

Posts tagged “40s

Think while you shoot/Rant in E-Minor/Creationism

“You ever noticed how people who believe in Creationism look really unevolved? You ever noticed that? Eyes real close together, eyebrow ridges, big furry hands and feet. “I believe God created me in one day” Yeah, looks like He rushed it.”

Bill Hicks

“Think while you shoot”

Martin Munkácsi

Munkácsi was a newspaper writer and photographer in Hungary, specializing in sports. At the time, sports action photography could only be done in bright light outdoors. Munkácsi’s innovation was to make sports photographs as meticulously composed action photographs, which required both artistic and technical skill.

Munkácsi’s legendary big break was to happen upon a fatal brawl, which he photographed. Those photos affected the outcome of the trial of the accused killer, and gave Munkácsi considerable notoriety. That notoriety helped him get a job in Berlin in 1928, for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, where his first published photo was a race car splashing its way through a puddle. He also worked for the fashion magazine Die Dame.

More than just sports and fashion, he photographed Berliners, rich and poor, in all their activities. He traveled to Turkey, Sicily, Egypt, London, New York, and famously Liberia, for photo spreads in the Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung.

The speed of the modern age and the excitement of new photographic viewpoints enthralled him, especially flying. There are aerial photographs; there are air-to-air photographs of a flying school for women; there are photographs from a Zeppelin, including the ones on his trip to Brazil, where he crosses over a boat whose passengers wave to the airship above.

On March 21, 1933, he photographed the fateful “Day of Potsdam”, where the aged President Paul von Hindenburg handed Germany over to Adolf Hitler. On assignment for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, he photographed Hitler’s inner circle, ironically because he was a Jew and a foreigner.

In 1934, the Nazis nationalized the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, fired its Jewish editor-in-chief, Kurt Korff, and replaced its innovative photography with pictures of German troops.

Munkácsi left for New York, where he signed on, for a substantial $100,000, with Harper’s Bazaar, a top fashion magazine. Innovatively, he often left the studio to shoot outdoors, on the beach, on farms and fields, at an airport. He produced one of the first articles illustrated with nude photographs in a popular magazine.

His portraits include Katharine Hepburn, Leslie Howard, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Jane Russell, Louis Armstrong, and the definitive dance photograph of Fred Astaire.

Munkácsi died in poverty and controversy. Several universities and museums declined to accept his archives, and they were scattered around the world.

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download soundtrack link: Bill Hicks – Rant in E-Minor

if you enjoy this album please obtain a legal copy

 


Constance Stuart Larrabee Photographs of African Tribes/Graucho and the Native Girls

“We took pictures of the native girls, but they weren’t developed. . . we’re going back next week.”

Groucho Marx

The English-born photographer Constance Stuart Larrabee is known for two distinct bodies of work: her black and white prints of South Africa’s tribal people (Zulu, Ndebele, Lovedu, Swazi, Sotho, Transkei, and Bushmen) – produced in the ’30s and ’40s – and her Life magazine-style photo-journalism in which she documented the liberation of Europe from the Nazis.

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Jacques Henri Lartigue’s Parisian Women/Curves/Mae West & Edith Piaf

“Curves:  The loveliest distance between two points.”

Mae West

Jacques Henri Lartigue (June 13, 1894 – September 12, 986) was a French photographer and painter.

Born in Courbevoie (a city outside of Paris) to a wealthy family, he is most famous for his stunning photos of automobile races, planes and fashionable Parisian women from the turn of the century.

Although Lartigue occasionally sold his pictures to the press and exhibited at the Galerie d’Orsay alongside Brassaï, Man Ray and Doisneau, his reputation as a photographer was not truly established until he was 69, with a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the publication of a portfolio in Life. He now added his father’s first name to his own surname, becoming Jacques Henri Lartigue. Worldwide fame came three years later with his first book, The Family Album, followed in 1970, by Diary of a Century, conceived by Richard Avedon. In 1975 he had his first French retrospective at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. For the rest of his life, Lartigue was busy answering commissions from fashion and decoration magazines.

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Click on Link to Download Soundtrack: The Voice of the Sparrow – Edith Piaf

if you enjoy this album please obtain a legal copy


the death of the japanese city/gojira/jack burton

When some wild-eyed, eight-foot-tall maniac grabs your neck, taps the back of your favorite head up against the barroom wall, looks you crooked in the eye and asks you if ya paid your dues, you just stare that big sucker right back in the eye, and you remember what ol’ Jack Burton always says at a time like that; “Yessir, the check is in the mail.”

Jack Burton

and yesterday couldn’t move/the gravity of the day holding me in place/ I dreamt that moths ate through all my clothes/cashmere knits resting in their draws/and awake to old rice glued onto all the crockery in the dishwasher/where the dishes wait to be washed by hand/ a thousand things to do/dirty clothes/dusty floors/hairs around the sink/piles of washing up all glazed in food/the sink blocked/emails/invoices/and I can’t face any of it/and aching sore from flagellation/shemale porn/harry s morgan movies/collette sigma/debora couer/trying to find something obscene and perverse/chasing the zero/ as if to shock myself like frankensteins monster with lightening bolts through my cock

as if

I’m trying

not to

thrash

some love

into

myself

but

rather,

beat

out

the

self

loathing

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photographs of nagasaki, hiroshima and godzilla post nuclear exposure


Antique Porn/Who would you fuck?/A basement apartment in Cohoes

“The universe is a big place, perhaps the biggest.”

Kilgore Trout

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and it was a toss up between a collection of all those sticky sickly color climax magazine covers where the penises and vaginas all look red raw or these dusty old antique porn images/but it was my mood/and I was drawn to the breasts/the slightly sagging honesty of them/the backgrounds/shoes/and frilly things/lingerie from the the schizophrenic shufflings of a time machine with a mechanical hard-on/their expressions/the accessibility of their imperfection/and the regular beauty we get today so homogenous/with trimmed clams/and dull visits to the gym/the war on cellulite/and the ladies seem cool with it/cool that their bodies are so random and different/and so sexualised because of this/and I want something tangible/something real/ to eat the type of pussy you need to wipe your mouth with the back of your hand when shes done/all these ladies come hard all shaking thighs around your ears/no theatrics/and it makes me think of Kilgore Trout/and Ghostface/and ODB/wide open beavers/but the question is/not about the scattered time periods

but who

would

you

fuck?

soundtrack: Supreme Clientele – Ghostface Killah

if you enjoy this album please purchase a legal copy


Alvin Lustig – New Classics Bookjackets – Set of 36

Book jackets artwork from the design legend Alvin Lustig, for the New Classics series. This is the full series from a the New Classics section of the Alvin Lustig website, to view his incredible ads, identities, periodicals, architecture, interiors and more book jacket artwork click on the link bellow.

Alvin Lustig

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“Lustig’s solution of a book jacket problem was seldom a literary solution. He was no verbalizer; as a matter of fact, writing came hard to him. His method was to read a text and get the feel of the author’s creative drive, then to restate it in his own graphic terms. Naturally these reformulations were most successful when there was an identity of interest, but it was remarkable how far he could go on alien ground.

In discussions of values in art the positiveness of his assertions occasionally suggested egotism; he would submit himself to it fully and with humility.I have heard people speak of the “Lustig style” but no one of them has been able to tell me, in fifty words or five hundred, what it was. Because each time, with each new book, there was a new creation. The only repetitions were those imposed by the physical media.”

by James Laughlin, New Directions – Print Magazine, Oct/Nov 1956