forgotten/lost/miscellaneous

Posts tagged “New York

Think while you shoot/Rant in E-Minor/Creationism

“You ever noticed how people who believe in Creationism look really unevolved? You ever noticed that? Eyes real close together, eyebrow ridges, big furry hands and feet. “I believe God created me in one day” Yeah, looks like He rushed it.”

Bill Hicks

“Think while you shoot”

Martin Munkácsi

Munkácsi was a newspaper writer and photographer in Hungary, specializing in sports. At the time, sports action photography could only be done in bright light outdoors. Munkácsi’s innovation was to make sports photographs as meticulously composed action photographs, which required both artistic and technical skill.

Munkácsi’s legendary big break was to happen upon a fatal brawl, which he photographed. Those photos affected the outcome of the trial of the accused killer, and gave Munkácsi considerable notoriety. That notoriety helped him get a job in Berlin in 1928, for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, where his first published photo was a race car splashing its way through a puddle. He also worked for the fashion magazine Die Dame.

More than just sports and fashion, he photographed Berliners, rich and poor, in all their activities. He traveled to Turkey, Sicily, Egypt, London, New York, and famously Liberia, for photo spreads in the Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung.

The speed of the modern age and the excitement of new photographic viewpoints enthralled him, especially flying. There are aerial photographs; there are air-to-air photographs of a flying school for women; there are photographs from a Zeppelin, including the ones on his trip to Brazil, where he crosses over a boat whose passengers wave to the airship above.

On March 21, 1933, he photographed the fateful “Day of Potsdam”, where the aged President Paul von Hindenburg handed Germany over to Adolf Hitler. On assignment for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, he photographed Hitler’s inner circle, ironically because he was a Jew and a foreigner.

In 1934, the Nazis nationalized the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, fired its Jewish editor-in-chief, Kurt Korff, and replaced its innovative photography with pictures of German troops.

Munkácsi left for New York, where he signed on, for a substantial $100,000, with Harper’s Bazaar, a top fashion magazine. Innovatively, he often left the studio to shoot outdoors, on the beach, on farms and fields, at an airport. He produced one of the first articles illustrated with nude photographs in a popular magazine.

His portraits include Katharine Hepburn, Leslie Howard, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Jane Russell, Louis Armstrong, and the definitive dance photograph of Fred Astaire.

Munkácsi died in poverty and controversy. Several universities and museums declined to accept his archives, and they were scattered around the world.

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download soundtrack link: Bill Hicks – Rant in E-Minor

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Alfred Stieglitz Photographs of New York/Sometimes, every once in a while, I remember back to when I had you/Sippin’ at Bells

“I don’t really mind living like this. Quiet, not much to say. But, sometimes, every once in a while, I remember back to when I had you.”

John Rosow/Michael Shannon

The Missing Person

Alfred Stieglitz (January 1, 1864 – July 13, 1946) was an American photographer and modern art promoter who was instrumental over his fifty-year career in making photography an accepted art form. In addition to his photography, Stieglitz is known for the New York art galleries that he ran in the early part of the 20th century, where he introduced many avant-garde European artists to the U.S. He was married to painter Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

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Blue Bird Legendary Savoy Sessions – Charlie Parker & Miles Davis

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70s Porn Poster Design/Catholocism/Mr Wankee Man & Me

“I thank God I was raised Catholic, so sex will always be dirty.”

John Waters

and the weekend left me bruised and trampled/paddled by a mistress whose nazi uniform/black strapon and heels/thrashed me on a st andrews cross/and buxom corseted ladies put me in the trampling cage and sat on my face/and put their heels in my mouth/and next to the dance floor a mistress whipped admirers as they lapped at her little pussy through the bars that guarded her/or them/and I thought that whilst that pussy looked good it was maybe riddled with herpes/and my arrogant chin thrust out I drew the line in the sand/and she hit me in the face/and outside the human ashtray/whose burns and ashy grey lips/and sissy boys/where freaks and fingerings/slaps and shuffles/stockings and shoes/breasts constricted in corsets and me drunk/staggering through this/like a half-tranquilised kaiju/riding through the grim carnival like gidrah/stroboscopic lights/and mr wankee man/shuffling dismally/using the least amount of energy and movement possible to slap both thighs with a sore looking penis/in some ketamine disco jiggle/gold lurex leotard/one stocking fallen down/blonde wig and golden mask/but when the mistress prodded my ass with her strappon/I was weary of being thrashed

and

just

wanted

to

get

naked

and

fuck

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Ancient Mexican Culture/Tres Leches/Where’s Your Gat Gringo?

“You ain’t a killer, you still learnin how to walk/From New York to Cali all the real niggaz carry chalk/Mark you for death, won’t even talk that East and West crap/From Watts to Lefrak, it ain’t where you’re from it’s where’s your gat.”

Big Punisher

excerpt and images from the new york times

Ruben E Reyes is Mexican. He was raised in Mexico City. But some of the indigenous Tarahumara people of northern Mexico had a word for him when he first traveled among them in 2002. The word was “gringo.”

“I was never called that before,” Mr. Reyes, 31, recalled recently.

Though his father’s family had come from an area about 50 miles away, Mr. Reyes was an outsider in the Copper Canyon, among the mountains of the Sierra Madre Occidental. He found the Tarahumara, who are known for their running prowess, living lives not wholly unlike their ancestors centuries ago, who fled to these elevations from the Spanish.

“They still had their own culture,” Mr. Reyes said. “It wasn’t Mexicanized.”

However, by the time he returned for several months in 2009 to photograph, Mr. Reyes saw signs of a cultural shift among the Tarahumara (also known as the Rarámuri). Men who had previously worn loincloths now wore jeans. Children, most of them now in school, were speaking Spanish, while their grandparents spoke only Tarahumara. People were leaving the canyon to seek work in the cities. Yet, at the same time, Mr. Reyes found many traditional religious practices still being maintained, alongside Catholic observances.

His black-and-white, medium-format photographs have a timelessness of their own, as if they had been taken a century ago. But this wasn’t the result of some conscious aesthetic strategy. “This is just the way I photograph,” Mr. Reyes said.

He currently works as a freelance photographer in Cincinnati, where he lives with his wife, Jamie, and their newborn daughter. That’s a long way from Copper Canyon.

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Soundtrack: Capital Punishment – Big Pun

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Korean War Photographs/Revelations/Military Science & War by Proxy

“I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones”

Albert Einstein

North and South Korea were sponsored by external powers, thus facilitating the war’s metamorphosis from a civil war to a proxy war between powers involved in the larger Cold War. From a military science perspective, the Korean War combined strategies and tactics of World War I and World War II—swift infantry attacks followed by air bombing raids. The initial mobile campaign transitioned to trench warfare, lasting from July 1951 until the 1953 border stalemate and armistice though minor outbreaks of fighting continue to the present day.

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Part of the imposing New York crew Monsta Island Czars, Megalon (a.k.a. Tommy Gunn a.k.a. the Black Jeezus of Rap) first gained recognition with his early Fondle ‘Em single “”One In A Million”” b/w “”Peace to the Homeless,”” as well as a show-stealing appearance on MF DOOM’s classic Operation: Doomsday. Flexing an intimidating, lightning-fast delivery paired with graphic lyrics focused primarily on narcotics conspiracy and bloodstained sidewalks, he’s one of the most popular members of the M.I.C. Though legal situations delayed its release, A Penny for Your Thoughts is nonetheless a great first album, loaded with illicit verses and dark, dramatic beatscapes provided by in-house producer X-Ray da Mindbenda.

Download Soundtrack: Penny for your Thoughts – Megalon

 


Buddy Esquire & Phase 2/Graves in the Snow/Old School Flyers

where junkies prowI,
where the tigers growI...

in search
of that much-needed bIow.

Where winos cringe
on a canned-heat binge...  

and find their graves
in the snow.

Russell Stevens Jr. / John Hull
 

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Long Live the Kane – Big Daddy Kane

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the birth of the american city/lady godiva and me/ezra pound

All great art is born of the metropolis.

Ezra Pound

photographs of american cities from the 1860s into the 20th century

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soundtrack: mighty joe moon – grant lee buffalo

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